Faded tones

searchingtosee

I am drawn to photographing surfaces: capturing texture, tones and hues; whether it be the weave of a fabric, the grain of a piece of wood or the finish of a wall. I like materials. Rough or smooth to the touch, shiny or matte, monochrome, subtle or vibrant shades, I want to record it all. I want the eye to scan the surface of the photograph and perceive it. I want it to skim over the cracks, the ruptures and the bumps; to flinch at the nicks and splinters; to absorb the palette; to process how the light turns texture and sensory experience into something flat, sleek and smooth: visually stimulating, passively tactile.

The urban environment provides endless fascinating material. I sometimes get strange glances when I point my camera at an ugly crumbling wall with peeling paint instead of a picture perfect view, but in truth I find views…

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Remembering Marc Chagall’s “I and the Village”

Tyson-Lord J. Gray

 

Marc Chagall,born July 7th 1887, was a Russian-French artist and was one of the most successful artists of the twentieth century. He was associated with several key art movements and created works in virtually every artistic medium including: paintings, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramics, tapestries and fine art prints.

The painting above,I and the Village,is perhaps one of Chagall’s most famous works and was painted in 1911 making 2012 its 101stanniversary. Considering that this upcoming July 7th 2012 will also mark the 125th birthday of Marc Chagall, it is only fitting to remember this legend and his work.

Thought to be a portrayal of the artist’s small village in which he grew up, this painting connects the intimate and personal with the vast and far-reaching by including houses and an Orthodox church from the artist’s Hasidic Community with varieties of large and small…

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